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Paracord Braiding

Set far apart from those plastic wovem braids is Paracord Braiding which is done with a nylon all around utility cord commonly known as paracord 550.  It is a tough, long lasting cord developed by the military during WWII for U.S. paratroopers.  If you are just beginning with your first paracord-braiding project, you should try to make something somewhat easy until your confidence builds – and it will build fast after your first braiding project .

It would be best to start your braiding using items you can wrap the paracord around at each end to keep the weave as tight as possible.  There are jigs available at a variety of places or you can even make your own with nails tapped partially into a workbench or short 2×4 short enough that can fit in your lap.  Here is an examplefound on Google to give you an idea.

Creating braids with more extensive weave patterns like a “cobra stitch” will take much more paracord, for a belt you would need 50 to 70 feet.  For smaller items like key chains or bracelets you will need about 15 feet.  You should almost always get more line than you initially think just to be safe by having enough.

So the first and best place to start with paracord braiding might be to start with a cobra stitch keychain.  You will be very impressed with your first braid.  The paracord cobra stitch keychains are very popular in high school and colleges with the school colors braided in.  They also are quick, easy to make and make great thoughtful gifts.  Things you’ll need – 1 Split ring, 36” of paracord (two colors if you like), and scissors.

Start:

  1. Fold the length of cord into two making the two loose ends reach the same length.
  2. Pass the loop (or middle of the two ends) through the split ring, and pull it through far enough to meet the two ends. Hold the split ring (or attach to a nail or lay on a flat surface) so that the middle loop and two ends are hanging down.  Adjust the loop to about 1 inch longer than the length of key chain you are trying to make.
  3. Separate each loose end of cording to either side of the center loop.
  4. Pick up the right side loose end cord and bring over the two center (loop) cords making a P or 4 shaped arc to the left side and then another P or 4 shape to the right side. (This righttoleft side bring should appear as a backwards looking P or a backwards looking 4, and step 6 below will have the cord drawn lefttoright and will look like a normal P or a normal 4)
  5. Grab the cord on the right and pass it down and into the loop on the right side, then around the back of the two loop strings and then up through the left side loop.  Pull the cords to make symmetric and then snuggle and work them to pull them tight together.
  6. Repeat step 4 but this time starting with the left side and do the same, repeating the step but in the opposite direction making a normal P or normal 4 shape.
  7. Repeat the actions of step 5 now, but grabbing the cord on the left and passing it down through the loop on the right side and up through the right side loop.
  8. Repeat these steps 4 – 7 progressing the weave to the length you decided (or about) in step 2 (length of keychain you are trying to make).
  9. Trim the two loose ends when finished weaving and seal each end with a flame coming close enough to each end held separately to fuse and stop any fraying.  The loop left exposed at the bottom of the weave is the end of the key chain.
  10. Attach your keys to the split ring and you are done.

So many things to make with different colors of this super cord, try these and amaze your friends and maybe you too…

A Keychain that make it easy to find in your pocket or purse weaved with a square flat pattern and especially with school colors.

A Necklace weaved in many ways including the double cobra weave that create personal and lasting gift ideas.

A Dog Collar that is comfortable for your dog, can be your favorite colors and is extremely strong even after many uses.

Endless varieties of paracord colors are obviously available, look around, learn and come back to these pages for new ideas.  We will add interesting topics all the time.

Paracord Necklace

A unique and popular Paracord Necklace can be made with an all around utility cord made usually of 7 inner strands of nylon with an impressive breaking point at 550 pounds.  The non-military commercial brands are commonly known as Paracord 550.  The military version has a specific trait that distinguishes it to be the original and can be found inside the cord when cut in half.  Inside you’ll find one of the layered strands to have a yellow and black cord.  There is not much difference between the commercial variety and the original military version.  But,  commercial paracord comes in an unlimited assortment of colors – even glow in the dark…

Many types of braiding paracord can result in almost endless uses, a belt, a wristband, a necklace and countless others.  A necklace is a great place to start when figuring out how to do it and of course further study will lead to many intricate weaving techniques, like double cobra stitch, flat weave and round weave.

A four strand round type of braid can make a nice even pattern for a paracord necklace using two pieces of paracord, and using two colors will make the pattern alternate.  Paracord 550 can be used, but remove the inner core by pulling it out of the paracord sheath.

To make a necklace with two paracord colors you will need:

20 feet of 550 paracord (or 10 feet each of 2 different colors if you so choose)
Scissors
Pencil

Start by: (Thinking Stitching and Weaving to help visualize, go slow at first step by step)

  1. Having two lengths of paracord about 10 feet each.  Rule of thumb is 1 foot of paracord normally works out to 1 inch of completed weave.
  2. Carefully pull the white inner threads pull and remove them out of the paracord outer covering sheath.
  3. On a flat table or surface lay the cords out, one vertical and the other horizontal but laying over the first one and intersecting in the middle and forming like a +.
  4. Bring the right vertical section over the horizontal piece, and then fold the horizontal cord on the left side up over the two vertical pieces.  Then slide a pen or pencil through the two pieces of cord and make a small loop that we can use as the neck fastener point.
  5. Now bring the right cord of the vertical folding over the horizontal two, and then bring the right most horizontal cord up and over to fold over the right and under the two left vertical cords.
  6. Now snug and pull all four strands together and make very snug and tight.  You should now see a square weave pattern at this point.
  7. Fold each of the top and bottom vertical cords over the square you completed above but do not cross them over each other.
  8. Now fold the right horizontal cord over the right-most vertical cord, and loop it back and under the left vertical cord.  Do not pull these weaves tight just yet
  9. Fold the left most horizontal cord up and over the left vertical cord, and then bring it down and under the right vertical strand.
  10. Now you can snug all four cords and then make tight.  You need to do this now after every successive weave is finished.  Now repeat this braiding until the necklace reaches the desired length.
  11. To clean up and secure the loose end tie a double knot small enough to fit through the other end, this creates the fastener to fit the necklace together once fitted around your neck
  12. You can and should fuse the ends to prevent frying by holding each open end to a match, burner, or lighter, but be very careful as the melted nylon is extremely hot and very sticky until it cools.

If you haven’t already – try to make these:

A Keychain that make it easy to find in your pocket or purse weaved with a square flat pattern and especially with school colors.

A Dog Collar that is comfortable for your dog, can be your favorite colors and is extremely strong even after many uses.

A Watchband can come in quite hande and is also comfortable on the wrist and again very very strong.

Let us how it goes and we are sure you will discover the best assortments of paracord colors and best deals for all of your stitching and weaving needs.

Paracord Watchband

To begin weaving the Paracord Watchband follow the instructions below carefully, you’ll get the hang of it fast.. Always useful, paracord 550 the sometimes colorful commercial variety and the military original version are a multi-task, useful cord. The paracord 550 comes from the fact that the military version was originally made in WWII and is required and certified to break at 550 pound.  The commercial version is closely the same but comes in limitless paracord colors.

To start this two color cobra weave you will need:

1 Watch
1 Paracord bracelet Buckle
1 hemostat recommended
1 pair of scissors
1 Lighter
15’ of paracord you can fuse together paracord colors equal length and start as below with the “middle” as the beginning loop.  Singe seal the ends lightly, compress to make end round and small and pointed. And let cool to make threading the cord ends easier.  By extra cord, and try this weave with the middle strands pulled out of the paracord sheath.  You may find this softer more pliable cord appealing, depending on your needs.
2 Paracord Buckles to snugly attach the paracord watchband to your wrist.

Start by:

Take 7” of one end of paracord and fold back on itself to make a soft loop.  Thread this ”loop” through the tie slot in the female half of the buckle with curve facing up and pull out by two inches.  Push the loose ends through this loop and pull tight to tighten the loop and cord at the tie in slot. This is the start and the anchor for the paracord watchband.

Keeping the two loose ends of cord flat and straight, pull through face down watch with watchband slot facing to the right and time/date adjustment dials pointing to the top.  Keep the two cords straight and thread through the watchband slot on the left.  Make sure cords are flat and straight across the back of the watch.

Pull the loose ends through the tie slot in the male side of the buckle and adjust watch to be in the center of the two buckles parts.  You may need to measure your wrist for proper fit, but for example you may adjust the right side of the watchband slot to be 3” from the middle of the female side of the buckle and 3” from the left side watchband slot to the middle of the male side of the buckle.

Now take the loose ends of the cord ant thread them through the male side of the buckle one additional time to secure.  Keep the cord straight and untangled.  With these two loose ends run them back and through the watchband slots, first left and then right on the outside of the first two and thread over and through the female buckle tie slot and down.   Pull the loose ends away from the buckle one to the left and one to the right.  Now you should have 4 straight lengths of cord between the two buckle halves.

Rotate the watch and buckle so that the watch is face up and the female buckle is at the top and the 12:00 hour should also be at the top.  Bring the right side cord over the outermost single straight length (between the buckle and the watch, but beginning this weave snug to the female buckle) and under the two center cords, and over the outermost single straight length on the left side.

Take this left side cord and then go back under the outermost left side single cord (wrapping around this outermost single cord).  And then continue over the two center cords and under the right side outermost single cord.

Then repeat this weave by going over the right-side outermost cord and under the two center cords, and over the outermost single cord on the left.  Then under (wrapping around) the outermost single cord coming then up and over the two center cords and going over the right side outermost single cord and then under (wrapping around) and then going over the two center cords.  Repeat this simple weave until you reach the wristband slots.  Start slow, once you start you will see that it is very easy.

As you make each weave snug and push to help tighten and straighten the weaves towards the buckle.  You should end with the last weave closet to the watch with the loose end on the right.  Flip the watch over and thread through the facedown watch wristband slot on the left and pull cord through.

Then repeat this weave by going over the right-side outermost cord and under the two center cords, and over the outermost single cord on the left.  Then under (wrapping around) the outermost single cord coming then up and over the two center cords and going over the right side outermost single cord and then under (wrapping around) and then going over the two center cords.  Repeat this simple weave until you reach the male end of the buckle.

After the last weave push the cord down and through to the bottom side use the hemostat if you need to.  And then with the hemostat pull the cord through the outermost single cord wrapped around the tie slot on this male buckle.

Now take the hemostat and on the backside of the watchband poke it through the last 3 center weave loops and grab the loose end and pull through, so that the cord is going under these last three center weaves.

Carefully hold this very sort end with the hemostat and singe seal it quickly with the lighter.  Let cool and poke under 4th last weave to conceal.  Repeat for female buckle side.

View our article on Paracord Buckles to learn how to fasten together your works of art with paracord in a snap.

Paracord Keychain

To make a stylish two-color Paracord Keychain we need to fuse two lengths together.  Fusing paracord together can be done in many ways; here is one approach that will conceal the join as best as possible.  You will need 2 ½ feet each of two Paracord Colors, a split ring, sharp knife or sharp scissors, crazy glue, and a jig with two carabineers to hold the strands taught, while your hands and fingers work freely to weave the paracord.

With the red length of paracord make a 45-degree cut on one end with a sharp knife or sharp scissors.  Then hold and twist this newly cut end above a flame from a lighter as evenly as possible to uniformly melt the end tip. While melted and very hot work quickly to fashion it into a small point using your moistened fingers or with gloves. Melted nylon is very hot and very sticky so be careful to not burn your skin.  Two or more colored strands will make a great looking paracord keychain.

With the black strand of paracord carefully pull out the interior white strands within the sheath about two inches, cut and dispose of these interior white strands. Lightly run your fingers up the paracord and past this end and retreating inner strands leaving a portion of “hollow” paracord.  Now slip the pointed red end into the hollow and push in as far as possible.  With the flame again lightly melt away the frays, gently and quickly roll in your fingertips a bit and then carefully add one to drops of crazy glue to the join. It will soak in quickly but pause to let the glue dry and you should be good to go.  Again melted paracord is burning hot and sticky, be very careful to not burn your skin.

With one “top” end of a jig holding a carabineer and a split type key ring and the bottom end of the jig holding in place a carabineer you are set to begin the weave for your paracord keychain.  Pull the black cord up through the bottom carabineer until you get to the middle and have the red cord underneath the black.

Now pull the two cords together and taught, up and over into the split key ring and then back down and under and through the bottom carabineer and repeat, but stopping after going through the top split key ring for the second time. Keep the paracords straight and the red cord will naturally weight to the left, don’t let them tangle all up..

To put the red in the middle of the keychain, hold the taught paracords at the ring with your right thumb and middle finger. Grasp the red paracord on the left and bring it over the taught paracords leaving a little backward “red P” shape on the left side of the ring and then bringing it to the right and letting it go on the right side.  Bring the black cord over the red cord on then to the right and then under the taught paracords and from under and up through the “red P” loop.  Now you should have a loose red paracord strand on the right and a loose black paracord strand on the left.

Working from the ring, kind of flatten the loops while pulling the loose strand to tighten the “knot”.  This first “weave” is the hardest and it will get easier.  Just don’t tighten this first weave to tight because it will create a twist in your keychain braid.

Next, make a “red P” loop on the right and drag the red paracord over the taught cords and to the left.  Bring the black paracord on the left (next to the ring) up and over the top of the red cord leftover on the leftside and then under the taught cords, bringing it to the right and then from under, up through the “red P” on the right of the ring and snug the weave together.

Now repeat by making a “red P” on the left and drag the red paracord over the taught cords and to the right.  Bring the black cord on the right (next to the ring) up and over the red cord leftover on the rightside, then back and under the taught cords bringing it to the left and then from under, up through the “red P” on the left of the ring and snug the weave together.

Keep alternating the above two steps to make the weave reach the carabineer at the bottom end of the rig.  Be sure to gently but firmly push the weave up a little towards the ring after each weave to keep it looking nice and even. Then just cut and burn the ends and you are done.

By using two colors fused together you have visually taught yourself one way to weave paracord.  Best of luck, take your time.  You will get the hang of it and quickly your fingers will want to help out, and make the whole process easier as you get used to it!

Have a go at creating these usefull accessories!

A Dog Collar that is comfortable for your dog, can be your favorite colors and is extremely strong even after many uses.

A Watchband can come in quite hande and is also comfortable on the wrist and again very very strong.

Paracord Dog Collar

Paracord 550 will make a very strong and reliable Paracord Dog Collar.  After all the 550 stands for a breaking strength at 550lbs.  In WWII the military came up with paracord for our aerial troops, that commercial cord makers have adopted and created a huge following with infinite paracord colors.

To begin a paracord dog collar you will need:
2 -inch and a half solid steel rings
1- lighter
A sharp knife or sharp scissors
Needle and thread to tie off the ends
One Carabineer
24 feet of Paracord 550 or two different strands of paracord colors at 12 feet each fused together is a standard

Fold the paracord at the middle join so each strand is equal length.  Hold one steel ring and bring the middle join through the steel ring about two inches.  Then bring the remaining strands through the ring and also through the paracord loop and snug up to attach to the steel ring.

Take the other steel ring and slid it down the open loos end of the strands.  Slide it up to the length you need the collar.  You can measure this length by wrapping it around your dog’s neck.  Don’t let go of the untied strands and the ring.  This is the beginning of the paracord dog collar.

Attach this ring to a hook and straighten the strands so they are nice and flat with one color of two strands on the right and the other color of two stands on the left.  Keep all four strands untwisted managing all four strands 2 with your left hand and 2 with your right hand.  Don’t worry you’ll get used to it.

Choose a color of paracord that you want on the outside, and start your loops with the other color.  Sounds whacky but here now we begin the weave. Let’s say you have black on the left and red on the right and you want black on the outside of the collar.  So with red strand on the right, form this “back” red strand into a kind of small “S” shape creating a “loop” on the left and a “loop” on the right of the centermost two “front” stands.

Now take the “front” black strand on the left (the two strands closest to each other and closest to the ring are called the “front” strands) and lay it over the red “loop” shape on the left and push it through by 2 inches and then bringing it under the 2 centered “front” strands. Then push it up through the red “loop” shape on the right and pull the remaining length of this black strand all the way up and through.  And snug the weave straight and tight-ish to the ring.

Next, take the red strand now on the left, form this “back” red strand into a kind of small “S” shape creating a “loop” on the right and a “loop” on the left of the centermost two “front” strands.  Take the “back” black strand now on the right and lay it over the red “loop” shape on the right and push it through by 2 inches and then bringing it under the 2 centered “front” strands.  Then push it up through the red ”loop” shape on the left and pull the remaining length of this black strand all the way up and through.  Snug this weave straight and tight-ish up to the previous weave.

Now take the red strand now on the right, form this “back” red strand into a kind of small “S” shape creating a “loops on the left and a “loop” on the left of the centermost two “front “strands.  Take the “back Black strand now on the left an lay it over the red “loop” shape onto the left and push it through by 2 inches and then bringing it under the 2 centered “front” strand.  Then push it up through the red “loop” shape on the right and pull the remaining length of this black strand all the way up and through.  Snug this weave straight and tight-ish up to the previous weave.

Alternate the above two steps to continue the weave up to the Steel ring attached to the center two “front” strands you tied in the very first step.  Cut the remaining two strands and sew them into the last weave to present a clean nice finish.

Good luck and hope we helped you along your path to a great paracord dog collar using a very popular “cobra” weave.

A Watchband can come in quite hande and is also comfortable on the wrist and again very very strong.

 

Paracord Buckles

With the popularity of paracord these days it’s no wonder that Paracord Buckles quickly became a popular choice to securely fasten together, bracelets, dog collars, livestock leads, etc.

Commercial paracord these days come in a variety of colors, and so do the these snappy strong devices.  More and more designs and styles and sizes come out every day.  For example there are colored plastic buckles that come in 3/8” side release, 5/8 with adjuster bar, 5/8” side release, 1” side release, side release whistle, break-away, round cord locks, chrome skull, stainless steel, and on and on.  Even all of the above contoured for bracelets and watchbands.

In our quest to contain our two huskie white retrievers we came across Paracord after watching an ex-marine survival guide weave together a dog collar for one of his dogs.  He demonstrated to us that he was doing a “cobra stitch”, and the uniqueness of it got us enthused and hooked.

He then showed us a few plastic lightweight paracord buckles that were strong light and quick. Two years and hundreds of leashes made with all kinds of stitches, paracord colors, flat weaves, square weaves for our friends and family, it’s become a bit of an addiction.  We try out different stitch or weave patterns all the time and it pretty much beats crossword puzzles all hollow!

We start of by attaching our favorite plastic secure heavy duty buckle and make our custom and hand-made leashes, bracelets, etc. with the knowledge that a four strand collar for example has a breaking strength at 2000lbs.  That’s quite amazing and hats off to the military for pulling this together for our troops years ago so our airborne troops were able to parachute in when needed.

They are sometimes called trigger-snaps and are strong enough to ensure that either of our adventurous dogs are not going to accidentally break away on an inadvertent scent.  Our neighbors and friends are always asking for something for their friends and relatives.  Even our family members are asking for new and inventive uses with skull buckles, metal buckles and seemingly everything in between.

Paracord belts clasped tightly together with a paracord buckle are something to mention as well.  Belts are made from a lot of paracord, woven, weaved and stitched form sometimes over 40’.  If you were to get into a predicament in the outdoors, this paracord belt and buckle might be a first choice survival tool.  Hopefully you won’t have to go here but think, tourniquet to slow the flow of bleeding, or sling for an injured arm etc. A strong belt with a strong buckle can really help out in an emergency.

In just a few seconds a belt  can be unraveled in mere seconds, which is extremely important.  With a quick release buckle or even a side release buckle it can be release quickly and taken apart with ease, especially with a cobra weave.

But even on the popularity side – everyone has embraced woven paracord products, college and high school kids are weaving their school colors, and designers are making a statement with beautiful fashion designs. Many of the attached with stong and various types and colors of paracord buckles

With the links on this page you can find the best products, ideas, and prices so check them out and have some fun.

Any questions or concerns please don’t hesitate to send us an email and we will get back to you a.s.a.p!  We have many more pages and ideas so feel free to explore…

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